Nd.0020


Case NumberND.0020
Date1920 -1923
Year0
TypeUnprovoked
CountryAUSTRALIA
AreaQueensland
LocationGreat Barrier Reef
ActivitySwimming
Name3 Japanese divers
SexM
Age37
InjuryFATAL
Fatal (Y/N)Y
Time12h00
SpeciesShark involvement not confirmed
Investigator or SourceV.M. Coppleson (1958), p.241

Comments

aprilsoto on 2018-03-18:

Two reasons. 1. Medicine is old, and a lot of its history needs Latin to understand the root words, which helps understand the general function 2. Latin is a good novel language which is highly descriptive in many cases. The way it is structured allows for very quick assessment, sometimes faster than English. You are learning both Latin and the different way it describes things. If i say Neocortical dorsal parietal hemorrhage, a surgeon will know exactly wooden ashtray i mean, regardless of where he is from. It is faster than saying “External bleed, on the top of the parietal lobe, in the newer formed area (from an evolutionary point of view)”. Sure you could say “bleed on top of the head” but not all cases are this simple. Latin allows you to be specific because of its affix (word-structure) nature. There does exist situations when English is faster or more descriptive, but not always, so why not have both?